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  • Rental Wage in Canada July 18, 2019
    Our new report maps rental affordability in neighbourhoods across Canada by calculating the “rental wage,” which is the hourly wage needed to afford an average apartment without spending more than 30% of one’s earnings.  Across all of Canada, the average wage needed to afford a two-bedroom apartment is $22.40/h, or $20.20/h for an average one […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
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    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
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    What do Suncor, Encana, the Royal Bank of Canada, the Fraser Institute and 46 other companies and organizations have in common? They are among the entities that make up the most influential fossil fuel industry players in Canada. Today, the Corporate Mapping Project (CMP) is drawing attention to these powerful corporations and organizations with the […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • Tickets available for Errol Black Chair Fundraising Brunch 2019 June 26, 2019
    You are invited to CCPA-MB’s annual fundraising brunch in support of the Errol Black Chair in Labour Issues.  Please join us to honour: Honoured Guest: John Loxley is Professor of Economics at the University of Manitoba and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada. Guest Speaker:  Jim Stanford is Economist and Director of the Centre […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • The fight against ISDS in Romania June 24, 2019
    CCPA is proud to co-sponsor this terrific video from our colleagues at Corporate Europe Observatory. It chronicles grassroots resistance to efforts by Canadian mining company Gabriel Resources to build Europe’s largest open-pit gold mine in a culturally rich and environmentally sensitive region of Romania. After this unimaginably destructive project was refused by the Romanian public and courts, the […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
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EI Benefits Decline Amid Rising Unemployment

Today, Statistics Canada reported that the number of Canadians receiving Employment Insurance (EI) benefits fell for a third consecutive month in November. This decline would be good news if it reflected an improving labour market. Unfortunately, unemployment has also increased for three consecutive months.

The trend is a dwindling number of beneficiaries among a growing pool of jobless workers. An implication is that EI recipients are exhausting their benefits without finding jobs.

The proportion of unemployed Canadians receiving EI benefits fell to 38.6% in November (i.e. 539,010 beneficiaries out of 1,394,700 unemployed workers). Statistics Canada reported an especially large decline in Ontario, where just 27.0% of unemployed workers received benefits (i.e. 156,330 beneficiaries out of 579,800 unemployed workers).

The administration of EI has recently attracted negative attention. While administrative improvements are undoubtedly warranted, more substantive policy changes are needed to increase the accessibility and duration of benefits for workers unemployed due to global economic factors beyond their control.

Comments

Comment from mike goodwin
Time: January 19, 2012, 10:37 am

in the fall of ’97 i wrote the same article for a local labor mag in hamilton, on.

i am in the states now and often friends criticize me for being here. but the fact is that there are too few jobs in canada to sustain job-seekers and one must eat.

my cndn friends also try to argue that things are rosier than they really are in ca. this seems to be a congenital, reflexive response rather than one based in critical thinking.

there seems to me to be a lack of empirical understanding among cndns re. the basic social indicators.

i suspect this is partly apathy among my upper-mid-class friends but also partly a growing trend across the country; people are too busy trying to make ends meet to spend much time thinking about/caring about the very conditions that will determine their possible success in this endeavour.

it’s the same thing that is happening here in the states.

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