Main menu:

History of RPE Thought

Posts by Tag

RSS New from the CCPA

  • A critical look at BC’s new tax breaks and subsidies for LNG May 7, 2019
    The BC government has offered much more to the LNG industry than the previous government. Read the report by senior economist Marc Lee.  
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • The 2019 living wage for Metro Vancouver April 30, 2019
    The 2019 living wage for Metro Vancouver is $19.50/hour. This is the amount needed for a family of four with each of two parents working full-time at this hourly rate to pay for necessities, support the healthy development of their children, escape severe financial stress and participate in the social, civic and cultural lives of […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • Time to regulate gas prices in BC and stop industry gouging April 29, 2019
    Drivers in Metro Vancouver are reeling from record high gas prices, and many commentators are blaming taxes. But it’s not taxes causing pain at the pump — it’s industry gouging. Our latest research shows that gas prices have gone up by 55 cents per litre since 2016 — and the vast majority of that increase […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • CCPA welcomes Randy Robinson as new Ontario Director March 27, 2019
    The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives is pleased to announce the appointment of Randy Robinson as the new Director of our Ontario Office.  Randy’s areas of expertise include public sector finance, the gendered rise of precarious work, neoliberalism, and labour rights. He has extensive experience in communications and research, and has been engaged in Ontario’s […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • 2019 Federal Budget Analysis February 27, 2019
    Watch this space for response and analysis of the federal budget from CCPA staff and our Alternative Federal Budget partners. More information will be added as it is available. Commentary and Analysis  Aim high, spend low: Federal budget 2019 by David MacDonald (CCPA) Budget 2019 fiddles while climate crisis looms by Hadrian Mertins-Kirkwood (CCPA) Budget hints at priorities for upcoming […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
Progressive Bloggers

Meta

Recent Blog Posts

Posts by Author

Recent Blog Comments

The Progressive Economics Forum

EI Coverage Falls Below 40%

It may be a grim Christmas for thousands of unemployed Canadians. Today’s Employment Insurance figures show that fewer workers received benefits in October, even as more became unemployed and filed EI claims.

Specifically, the number of people receiving regular benefits declined from 546,580 in September to 541,230 in October. The Labour Force Survey indicates that unemployment rose from 1,334,200 in September to 1,374,200 in October. Therefore, only 39% of unemployed Canadians got benefits (i.e. 541,230/1,374,200 = 0.39).

The situation was even worse in Ontario, which had only 159,630 beneficiaries out of 592,700 unemployed workers. In other words, scarcely more than one-quarter of unemployed Ontarians received benefits (i.e. 159,630/592,700 = 0.27).

Statistics Canada has already reported that national unemployment rose further in November, due to economic factors beyond the control of Canadian workers. The EI system’s apparent inadequacy should be a major concern. The labour movement has long proposed to help more jobless workers by improving the accessibility and duration of EI benefits.

UPDATE (December 17): Quoted in The Hamilton Spectator (page T7).

Enjoy and share:

Comments

Comment from Andrew
Time: December 16, 2011, 8:46 am

Likely reflects the rising proportion of the unemployed who have not been laid off from a full time permanent job, notably young people seeking work.

Comment from Purple Library Guy
Time: December 19, 2011, 3:20 pm

Hm. That in turn would reflect the ongoing shift from full time permanent jobs to part time precarious jobs.

Write a comment





Related articles