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  • Report looks at captured nature of BC’s Oil and Gas Commission August 6, 2019
    From an early stage, BC’s Oil and Gas Commission bore the hallmarks of a captured regulator. The very industry that the Commission was formed to regulate had a significant hand in its creation and, too often, the interests of the industry it regulates take precedence over the public interest. This report looks at the evolution […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • Correcting the Record July 26, 2019
    Earlier this week Kris Sims and Franco Terrazzano of the Canadian Taxpayers Federation wrote an opinion piece that was published in the Calgary Sun, Edmonton Sun, Winnipeg Sun, Ottawa Sun and Toronto Sun. The opinion piece makes several false claims and connections regarding the Corporate Mapping Project (CMP), which we would like to correct. The […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • Rental Wage in Canada July 18, 2019
    Our new report maps rental affordability in neighbourhoods across Canada by calculating the “rental wage,” which is the hourly wage needed to afford an average apartment without spending more than 30% of one’s earnings.  Across all of Canada, the average wage needed to afford a two-bedroom apartment is $22.40/h, or $20.20/h for an average one […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • Towards Justice: Tackling Indigenous Child Poverty in Canada July 9, 2019
    CCPA senior economist David Macdonald co-authored a new report, Towards Justice: Tackling Indigenous Child Poverty in Canada­—released by Upstream Institute in partnership with the Assembly of First Nations (AFN) and the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA)—tracks child poverty rates using Census 2006, the 2011 National Household Survey and Census 2016. The report is available for […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • Fossil-Power Top 50 launched July 3, 2019
    What do Suncor, Encana, the Royal Bank of Canada, the Fraser Institute and 46 other companies and organizations have in common? They are among the entities that make up the most influential fossil fuel industry players in Canada. Today, the Corporate Mapping Project (CMP) is drawing attention to these powerful corporations and organizations with the […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
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The Progressive Economics Forum

Labour market stagnant

Erin has already commented that the tiny silver lining of 26,000 net new jobs in May covers a net loss of full-time jobs. In fact, if you compare this May to May 2013, we see that all of the net job gain in the past 12 months is part-time work too.

To look at the trends, I broke down employment growth since October 2008 into part-time and full-time jobs. This shows that full-time job growth has been pretty much stagnant since January 2013.

FTPT

While we expect to see stronger growth in part time work earlier in a recovery, here we see the growth of part-time work accelerating again – over four years after the beginning of the recession.

The number of underemployed part-time workers (working part-time, wanting full-time hours) has remained elevated since the beginning of this recession. You can see from the graph that there was some easing in 2012, but with the recent increase in part-time work, the trend is moving upwards again.

underemployed

 

This May there were over 1 million underemployed part-time workers in Canada, and a total of 2.9 million unemployed and underemployed workers (not seasonally adjusted). Nearly 1 million of those workers were under the age of 24.

Ontario workers, in particular, are having a hard time. The underemployment rate for Ontario (not seasonally adjusted) was 16.6% in May – 2 percentage points higher than the national average. That represents 550,000 unemployed and 735,000 underemployed Ontario workers.

And Tim Hudak plans to fix that by firing 100,000 public sector workers. I think we need a better plan.

Enjoy and share:

Comments

Comment from fjf
Time: June 9, 2014, 10:37 pm

The G&M reports today June 9th on Joe Oliver’s remarks to the effect that two of Canada’s major provinces, Quebec and Ontario, are in danger of having their debt ratings downgraded due to high debt levels.

This comment sounds as if it is intended to help promote Hudak’s platform.

Would it be possible for one of the PEF economists to examine the issue of federal downloading and the way in which this has negatively impacted provincial and civic finances?

My memory is that this downloading commenced with Chretien, and was further advanced by the Harris government. Chretien downloaded to the provinces and “leaders” such as Harris turned around and downloaded to the cities. Federal and Provincial tax rates stayed the same but urban centers boosted property tax rates and this gave us media events such as the Ford administration.

A second outcome is that while the Federal government collects the majority of income, it has cut, and proposes to continue to cut, transfers to the provinces. This results in fiscal improvements at the Federal level and gives a “leader” like Joe Oliver ammunition to complain about the behaviour of the very persons he has short shrifted.

Plus the people at the bottom of the pyramid are very conscious of the fact that they are paying for the indexed pensions of civil servants when they are unable to save anything to provide for their own retirement.

Oliver’s recommendation for a provincial austerity program, if enacted, will likely increase the “politics of resentment” and increase the numbers who vote for right wing “austerity solutions” such as $35 billion for a fighter plane that is unlikely to meet Canadian requirements.

Is this analysis correct? Can the economists confirm?
Thanks.

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