Main menu:

History of RPE Thought

Posts by Tag

RSS New from the CCPA

  • Report looks at captured nature of BC’s Oil and Gas Commission August 6, 2019
    From an early stage, BC’s Oil and Gas Commission bore the hallmarks of a captured regulator. The very industry that the Commission was formed to regulate had a significant hand in its creation and, too often, the interests of the industry it regulates take precedence over the public interest. This report looks at the evolution […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • Correcting the Record July 26, 2019
    Earlier this week Kris Sims and Franco Terrazzano of the Canadian Taxpayers Federation wrote an opinion piece that was published in the Calgary Sun, Edmonton Sun, Winnipeg Sun, Ottawa Sun and Toronto Sun. The opinion piece makes several false claims and connections regarding the Corporate Mapping Project (CMP), which we would like to correct. The […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • Rental Wage in Canada July 18, 2019
    Our new report maps rental affordability in neighbourhoods across Canada by calculating the “rental wage,” which is the hourly wage needed to afford an average apartment without spending more than 30% of one’s earnings.  Across all of Canada, the average wage needed to afford a two-bedroom apartment is $22.40/h, or $20.20/h for an average one […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • Towards Justice: Tackling Indigenous Child Poverty in Canada July 9, 2019
    CCPA senior economist David Macdonald co-authored a new report, Towards Justice: Tackling Indigenous Child Poverty in Canada­—released by Upstream Institute in partnership with the Assembly of First Nations (AFN) and the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA)—tracks child poverty rates using Census 2006, the 2011 National Household Survey and Census 2016. The report is available for […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • Fossil-Power Top 50 launched July 3, 2019
    What do Suncor, Encana, the Royal Bank of Canada, the Fraser Institute and 46 other companies and organizations have in common? They are among the entities that make up the most influential fossil fuel industry players in Canada. Today, the Corporate Mapping Project (CMP) is drawing attention to these powerful corporations and organizations with the […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
Progressive Bloggers

Meta

Recent Blog Posts

Posts by Author

Recent Blog Comments

The Progressive Economics Forum

Measuring Youth Unemployment

Miles Corak has a great post up about Paul Krugman’s “favourite gauge” of unemployment, the employment rate.  Looking at the ratio of employed to population for working age men, he shows that the employment recovery in Canada appears to have stalled, moving very little since January 2011.

The graph below shows youth unemployment (right axis) and employment (left axis) from January 2007.  In August 2012, youth unemployment was 14.8% – an improvement of 1.6 percentage points since the peak of the recession.  The youth employment rate in August, however, was actually at its lowest point since the recession hit, with only 54% of youth aged 15-24 employed.  So, by the employment rate, there has been no lasting recovery for youth.

Enjoy and share:

Comments

Comment from Brandon L
Time: September 16, 2012, 2:12 pm

Not forgetting to mention many youth are starting with debt that cannot be discharged in bankruptcy, are watching prices rise for basic necessities without matching wages, salaries, or incomes, expected to pay for baby boomers.

The typical social liberals (me) don’t care who you sleep with, choose too marry(polygamists, homosexual, heterosexual, asexuality), put whatever drug into your own body. This demographic which was poison to social conservatives, or % of old people. How many young people agree with the above is the majority

New Right from this group state only in living in one means is conservative enough(much easier sell politically) especially after watching their parents, or themselves take on to much debt. New Right states – the govt assumes the right to take your property without your consent – through taxation, and the coperations (and especially the creditors of banks, who hold their bonds) also assume the right to take your property without your consent through inflation, higher cost of life

Write a comment





Related articles