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  • How to make NAFTA sustainable, equitable July 19, 2017
    Global Affairs Canada is consulting Canadians on their priorities for, and concerns about, the planned renegotiation of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). In CCPA’s submission to this process, Scott Sinclair, Stuart Trew and Hadrian Mertins-Kirkwood point out how NAFTA has failed to live up to its promise with respect to job and productivity […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • What’s next for BC? July 4, 2017
    Five weeks ago the CCPA-BC began a letter to our supporters with this statement: “What an interesting and exciting moment in BC politics! For a bunch of policy nerds like us at the CCPA, it doesn’t get much better than this.” At the time, we were writing about the just-announced agreement between the BC NDP […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • Could skyrocketing private sector debt spell economic crisis? June 21, 2017
    Our latest report finds that Canada is racking up private sector debt faster than any other advanced economy in the world, putting the country at risk of serious economic consequences. The report, Addicted to Debt, reveals that Canada has added $1 trillion in private sector debt over the past five years, with the corporate sector […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • The energy industry’s insatiable thirst for water threatens First Nations’ treaty-protected rights June 21, 2017
    Our latest report looks at the growing concerns that First Nations in British Columbia have with the fossil fuel industry’s increasing need for large volumes of water for natural gas fracking operations. Titled Fracking, First Nations and Water: Respecting Indigenous rights and better protecting our shared resources, it describes what steps should be taken to […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • Betting on Bitumen: Alberta's energy policies from Lougheed to Klein June 8, 2017
    The role of government in Alberta, both involvement and funding, has been critical in ensuring that more than narrow corporate interests were served in the development of the province’s bitumen resources.  A new report contrasts the approaches taken by two former premiers during the industry’s early development and rapid expansion periods.  The Lougheed government invested […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
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The Progressive Economics Forum

Danny Williams’ PSE Legacy

Keith Dunne and I have an opinion piece out on what we consider to be one of the best-kept secrets in Canadian social policy:  Danny Williams’ post-secondary education (PSE) legacy.  Among other things, the piece points out that:

-Since 2003, the Newfoundland and Labrador government has increased funding for PSE by 82 percent.

-Average tuition fees for domestic students in Newfoundland and Labrador are now roughly $2,600 per year, which is half the Canadian average. (In Ontario, the corresponding figure is just over $6,300.)

-Enrolment in Newfoundland and Labrador’s only university and only community college by students from the other three Atlantic provinces increased more than tenfold between 2001 and 2008. 

-Since the late 1990s, the number of people in Newfoundland and Labrador with student debt has decreased from roughly 20,000 to roughly 8,000.

We believe that Newfoundland and Labrador’s experience in making a post-secondary education more affordable has important implications for the rest of Canada.

Enjoy and share:

Comments

Comment from Alex Zannis
Time: March 22, 2011, 9:58 am

Although I agree that these investments are vital for Canada’s future and these particular government decisions could prove a useful model for other provinces, I’m curious to know how much these investments and the funding necessary to pursue them were made possible by Newfoundland’s ‘newfound’ resource wealth, particularly offshore oil. Surely the federal government under Paul Martin, which exempted future oil revenues from being calculated into Newfoundland’s equalization payments, should receive a bit of the credit for these policy successes as well.
This seems as much a model for developing countries in how to avoid the resource curse as it is an example of smart provincial investment.

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