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  • Pharmacare consensus principles released today September 24, 2018
    A diverse coalition representing health care providers, non-profit organizations, workers, seniors, patients and academics has come together to issue a statement of consensus principles for the establishment of National Pharmacare in Canada. Our coalition believes that National Pharmacare should be a seamless extension of the existing universal health care system in Canada, which covers medically […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • Kate McInturff Fellowship in Gender Justice September 19, 2018
    The CCPA is pleased to announce the creation of the Kate McInturff Fellowship in Gender Justice.This Fellowship is created to honour the legacy of senior researcher Kate McInturff who passed away in July 2018. Kate was a feminist trailblazer in public policy and gender-based research and achieved national acclaim for researching, writing, and producing CCPA’s […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • The buck-a-beer challenge Ontario deserves September 6, 2018
    Ricardo Tranjan proposes an alternate plan to Doug Ford's buck-a-beer challenge in the Toronto Star.
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • Growing number of professionals face job insecurity, study finds September 6, 2018
    The Toronto Star's Sara Mojtehedzadeh discusses the findings of the CCPA Ontario's report, No Safe Harbour and gathers firsthand accounts from precariously employed professionals who live and work in Ontario.
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • Our Schools/Our Selves: The view from West Virginia September 4, 2018
    Our latests publication, Lesson Here, digs in to the West Viriginia teachers' strike.  Read the firsthand accounts of the work stoppage here.
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
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The Progressive Economics Forum

Carey Doberstein’s book on homelessness governance

I’ve just reviewed Professor Carey Doberstein’s book on homelessness governance (UBC Press). The book looks at the way decisions were made pertaining to funding for homelessness programs in Vancouver, Calgary and Toronto during the 1995-2015 period.

Points raised in my review include the following:

-Homelessness trends look quite different across the three cities. For example, it can be growing in one city, but declining in another.

-One of the book’s main arguments is that better decisions pertaining to homelessness programming are made when multiple stakeholders are engaged in decision-making early and often.

-The book argues that Vancouver and Calgary have done a relatively good job of such engagement—more so than Toronto.

My full review can be read here.

(A modified version of this review will appear in an upcoming edition of the Canadian Journal of Political Science.)

Enjoy and share:

Comments

Comment from Larry Kazdan
Time: June 8, 2018, 8:07 pm

Re: Death at Vancouver Tim Hortons highlights widening front line in homelessness,
DERRICK PENNER, June 6, 2018
http://vancouversun.com/news/local-news/death-at-vancouver-tim-hortons-highlights-widening-front-line-in-homelessness

Changes in the housing market are leading to more sick and aging people finding themselves on the streets – witness the recent death of a homeless senior inside a Vancouver Tim Hortons all-night coffee shop.

Urgent remedial action is required. Yet in Vancouver, federal spending on homelessness is only one-twentieth of that provided by the province. This is the same federal government that has just found $4.5 billion to purchase the Trans Mountain pipeline, with at least another $7 billion needed to finish the project.

Our local Liberal MPs might urge their Ottawa masters to devote as many resources to expediting emergency housing that meets the needs of ordinary people as to meeting deadlines and ultimatums set by big oil and gas companies.

Footnotes:

1. Nick Falvo: Ten things to know about Carey Doberstein’s book on homelessness governance
behindthenumbers

… in Vancouver, provincial spending on homelessness exceeds federal spending on homelessness by a 20:1 ratio (if one includes capital funding).

2. Canada Buys Pipeline as Oil Bubble Is About to Burst
thetyee
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau just dropped $4.5 billion of taxpayers’ money on a 67-year-old pipeline, with at least another $7 billion needed to finish what the private sector backed away from.

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