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  • CCPA SK Annual General Meeting October 11, 2019
    Please join us for our Annual General Meeting in Saskatoon, 5:00pm, Thursday, October 24th at Station 20 West. (1120 20th St. West) Courtney Carlberg, author of Saskatchewan's Failing Report Card on Child Care, will discuss why Saskatchewan ranks the lowest for overall quality and rates of access to regulated child care in the country and […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • Corporate Mapping Project receives award for research excellence October 9, 2019
    The co-directors of the Corporate Mapping Project—CCPA-BC Director Shannon Daub and the University of Victoria’s William Carroll—are being celebrated in Victoria today as they accept a REACH Award for Excellence in Research. The REACH Awards recognize “research excellence” as demonstrated through scholarly contributions and societal impact. Since the inception of the Corporate Mapping Project, Shannon […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • Unpacking the details of Manitoba Hydro September 9, 2019
    What would a long view of Manitoba Hydro all entail.  Read report here.
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • CCPA submission to Treasury Board consultation on regulatory modernization September 6, 2019
    On June 29, 2019, the federal government launched a public consultation on initiatives intended to "modernize" the Canadian regulatory system. Interested Canadians were invited to provide input on four current initiatives: Targeted Regulatory Reviews (Round 2) Review of the Red Tape Reduction Act Exploring options to legislate changes to regulator mandates Suggestions for the next […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • Join us in November for the 2019 CCPA-BC Gala, featuring Nancy MacLean September 3, 2019
    Tickets are available for our 2019 Annual Gala Fundraiser, which will take place in Vancouver on November 21. This year’s featured speaker will be Nancy MacLean, an award-winning historian and author whose talk, The rise of the radical right: How libertarian intellectuals, billionaires and white supremacists shaped today’s politics, is very timely both in the US and here in […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
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The Progressive Economics Forum

The 2016 Federal Budget

Here is a link to the Broadbent Institute pre Budget Submission, trying to push the Liberal platform in a more progressive and social democratic direction.

http://www.broadbentinstitute.ca/budget_2016_charting_progressive_agenda

 

Enjoy and share:

Comments

Comment from Herb Wiseman
Time: February 8, 2016, 1:00 pm

There is no discussion in this article virtually about the third highest budget expenditure in the budget — namely the debt service charges line or interest on the debt. There is talk about inequality and poverty but the huge size of the interest payments precludes much being done to bring about or increase other progressive measures. That is not to say that the country should enter into an austerity programme to pay down the debt but rather to consider other alternatives including the Bank of Canada holding a greater portion of the debt if not all of it. In practice the huge interest payments ($25.7 billion) in the current budget are a transfer of tax dollars to well-off people and that has both the effect of increasing inequality and shifting more money to the financial sector from the productive sector.

Comment from Larry Kazdan
Time: February 15, 2016, 7:48 pm

And further to Herb’s point, why does the Broadbent Insititute not challenge the conservative fiscal policy anchors such as debt-to-GDP ratios intended to restrain government spending but which have no real justification:

William Mitchell is a Professor in Economics and Director of the Centre of Full Employment and Equity (CofFEE),
at the University of Newcastle, NSW, Australia
http://bilbo.economicoutlook.net/blog/?p=30105

“The public debt level relative to GDP is not a matter of economic concern ever if the government in question issues its own currency and only issues debt in that currency.

Under those circumstances the government can always service its nominal liabilities and the public debt ratio is an irrelevant focus of attention.

At any time of its choosing, the government could cease to issue public debt and continue deficit spending at will. It might have to change some regulations and statutes which have been put in place to give the impression that the debt issuance is funding its net spending, but that would be merely legislative activity.

Remember the government just borrows back what it spent in deficit in a previous period. Bond sales draw on private saving which is just a reflection of past deficits.”

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