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  • Imagine a Winnipeg...2018 Alternative Municipal Budget June 18, 2018
    Climate change; stagnant global economic growth; political polarization; growing inequality.  Our city finds itself dealing with all these issues, and more at once. The 2018 Alternative Municipal Budget (AMB) is a community response that shows how the city can deal with all these issues and balance the budget.
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • Why would a boom town need charity? Inequities in Saskatchewan’s oil boom and bust May 23, 2018
    When we think of a “boomtown,” we often imagine a formerly sleepy rural town suddenly awash in wealth and economic expansion. It might surprise some to learn that for many municipalities in oil-producing regions in Saskatchewan, the costs of servicing the oil boom can outweigh the benefits. A Prairie Patchwork: Reliance on Oil Industry Philanthropy […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • CCPA's National Office has moved! May 11, 2018
      The week of May 1st, the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives' National Office moved to 141 Laurier Ave W, Suite 1000, Ottawa ON, K1P 5J2. Please note that our phone, fax and general e-mail will remain the same: Telephone: 613-563-1341 | Fax: 613-233-1458 | Email: ccpa@policyalternatives.ca  
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • What are Canada’s energy options in a carbon-constrained world? May 1, 2018
    Canada faces some very difficult choices in maintaining energy security while meeting emissions reduction targets.  A new study by veteran earth scientist David Hughes—published through the Corporate Mapping Project, the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives and the Parkland Institute—is a comprehensive assessment of Canada’s energy systems in light of the need to maintain energy security and […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • The 2018 Living Wage for Metro Vancouver April 25, 2018
    The cost of raising a family in British Columbia increased slightly from 2017 to 2018. A $20.91 hourly wage is needed to cover the costs of raising a family in Metro Vancouver, up from $20.61 per hour in 2017 due to soaring housing costs. This is the hourly wage that two working parents with two young children […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
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The Progressive Economics Forum

The 2016 Federal Budget

Here is a link to the Broadbent Institute pre Budget Submission, trying to push the Liberal platform in a more progressive and social democratic direction.

http://www.broadbentinstitute.ca/budget_2016_charting_progressive_agenda

 

Enjoy and share:

Comments

Comment from Herb Wiseman
Time: February 8, 2016, 1:00 pm

There is no discussion in this article virtually about the third highest budget expenditure in the budget — namely the debt service charges line or interest on the debt. There is talk about inequality and poverty but the huge size of the interest payments precludes much being done to bring about or increase other progressive measures. That is not to say that the country should enter into an austerity programme to pay down the debt but rather to consider other alternatives including the Bank of Canada holding a greater portion of the debt if not all of it. In practice the huge interest payments ($25.7 billion) in the current budget are a transfer of tax dollars to well-off people and that has both the effect of increasing inequality and shifting more money to the financial sector from the productive sector.

Comment from Larry Kazdan
Time: February 15, 2016, 7:48 pm

And further to Herb’s point, why does the Broadbent Insititute not challenge the conservative fiscal policy anchors such as debt-to-GDP ratios intended to restrain government spending but which have no real justification:

William Mitchell is a Professor in Economics and Director of the Centre of Full Employment and Equity (CofFEE),
at the University of Newcastle, NSW, Australia
http://bilbo.economicoutlook.net/blog/?p=30105

“The public debt level relative to GDP is not a matter of economic concern ever if the government in question issues its own currency and only issues debt in that currency.

Under those circumstances the government can always service its nominal liabilities and the public debt ratio is an irrelevant focus of attention.

At any time of its choosing, the government could cease to issue public debt and continue deficit spending at will. It might have to change some regulations and statutes which have been put in place to give the impression that the debt issuance is funding its net spending, but that would be merely legislative activity.

Remember the government just borrows back what it spent in deficit in a previous period. Bond sales draw on private saving which is just a reflection of past deficits.”

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