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  • CCPA in Europe for CETA speaking tour October 17, 2017
    On September 21, Canada and the European Union announced that the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA), a controversial NAFTA-plus free trade deal initiated by the Harper government and signed by Prime Minister Trudeau in 2016, was now provisionally in force. In Europe, however, more than 20 countries have yet to officially ratify the deal, […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • Twelve year study of an inner-city neighbourhood October 12, 2017
    What does twelve years of community organizing look like for a North End Winnipeg neighbourhood?  Jessica Leigh survey's those years with the Dufferin community from a community development lens.  Read full report.
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • Losing your ID - even harder to recover when you have limited resources! October 10, 2017
    Ellen Smirl researched the barriers experienced by low-income Manitobans when faced with trying to replace lost, stolen, or never aquired idenfication forms. Read full report here.  
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • CCPA recommendations for a better North American trade model October 6, 2017
    The all-party House of Commons trade committee is consulting Canadians on their priorities for bilateral and trilateral North American trade in light of the current renegotiation of NAFTA. In the CCPA’s submission to this process, Scott Sinclair, Stuart Trew, and Hadrian Mertins-Kirkwood argue for a different kind of trading relationship that is inclusive, transformative, and […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • Ontario’s fair wage policy needs to be refreshed September 28, 2017
    The Ontario government is consulting on ways to modernize the province’s fair wage policy, which sets standards for wages and working conditions for government contract workers such as building cleaners, security guards, building trades and construction workers. The fair wage policy hasn’t been updated since 1995, but the labour market has changed dramatically since then. […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
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The Progressive Economics Forum

The 2016 Federal Budget

Here is a link to the Broadbent Institute pre Budget Submission, trying to push the Liberal platform in a more progressive and social democratic direction.

http://www.broadbentinstitute.ca/budget_2016_charting_progressive_agenda

 

Enjoy and share:

Comments

Comment from Herb Wiseman
Time: February 8, 2016, 1:00 pm

There is no discussion in this article virtually about the third highest budget expenditure in the budget — namely the debt service charges line or interest on the debt. There is talk about inequality and poverty but the huge size of the interest payments precludes much being done to bring about or increase other progressive measures. That is not to say that the country should enter into an austerity programme to pay down the debt but rather to consider other alternatives including the Bank of Canada holding a greater portion of the debt if not all of it. In practice the huge interest payments ($25.7 billion) in the current budget are a transfer of tax dollars to well-off people and that has both the effect of increasing inequality and shifting more money to the financial sector from the productive sector.

Comment from Larry Kazdan
Time: February 15, 2016, 7:48 pm

And further to Herb’s point, why does the Broadbent Insititute not challenge the conservative fiscal policy anchors such as debt-to-GDP ratios intended to restrain government spending but which have no real justification:

William Mitchell is a Professor in Economics and Director of the Centre of Full Employment and Equity (CofFEE),
at the University of Newcastle, NSW, Australia
http://bilbo.economicoutlook.net/blog/?p=30105

“The public debt level relative to GDP is not a matter of economic concern ever if the government in question issues its own currency and only issues debt in that currency.

Under those circumstances the government can always service its nominal liabilities and the public debt ratio is an irrelevant focus of attention.

At any time of its choosing, the government could cease to issue public debt and continue deficit spending at will. It might have to change some regulations and statutes which have been put in place to give the impression that the debt issuance is funding its net spending, but that would be merely legislative activity.

Remember the government just borrows back what it spent in deficit in a previous period. Bond sales draw on private saving which is just a reflection of past deficits.”

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