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The Progressive Economics Forum

Too Early to Call Recession Over

Statistics Canada is reporting a 0.3% increase in monthly GDP for July, on top of a (downward revised) 0.4% increase in June. This will no doubt spark Conservative politicians, and many economists, to declare that the shallow recession which Canada experienced in the first half of 2015 is already over.

As recently as last week, Finance Minister Joe Oliver was still denying the existence of the first-half recession.  We can certainly debate the depth and longevity of that downturn, but there is no denying that real GDP fell for two consecutive quarters — economists’ traditional (and, until now, not very controversial) benchmark.

Prime Minister Harper brushed off the official recession as “a couple of weak months.”  (In fact, monthly GDP fell in 6 of 8 months from October through June.)  But now it seems that 2 months of positive data is more than enough to conclusively declare the recession over — and, for Conservative politicians, more evidence that their plan is “working.”

Never mind that this is the same Conservative “plan” that contributed to Canada experiencing the only recession among major industrial economies so far this year.  Claiming “victory” because GDP is growing again after a recession, is a bit like commenting on how good it feels to stop beating your head against the wall.  Before popping any champagne, we’d better pause to ask: why were we beating our heads against the wall in the first place?

And while the June and July GDP numbers are positive, in my view it is too early to conclusively declare the recession over.  Here are some cautionary notes:

  • 70% of July’s GDP growth (and 50% of June’s) was due to one sector: oil & mining. In particular, non-conventional oil production rebounded after forest fires and maintenance shutdowns cut its output in the spring. That rebound cannot be repeated.
  • In non-oil sectors, the GDP numbers are decidedly more mixed. Of the 19 other 2-digit sectors tracked by Statistics Canada (other than oil&mining), 9 experienced zero or negative growth in July. The June and July numbers reflect a major rebound in oil production, but they do not yet indicate an economy-wide recovery.
  • Private sector payrolls shrank in the first two months of the third quarter (according to the Labour Force Survey).  Total employment grew marginally, solely reflecting public sector hiring.  In fact, private sector employment is still lower (as of August) than in October of last year.
  • Remember, the monthly GDP by industry data uses a totally different methodology than the quarterly GDP by expenditure data — and it is the latter that determines quarterly growth rates (and hence whether or not we are in recession).  In particular, the monthly numbers will not reflect the continuing decline in business capital spending which was the dominant factor behind the GDP shrinkage in the first half.
  • Other macro indicators weakened during the third quarter, hardly indicating a “recovery” (including commodity prices, the loonie, the stock market, and interest rates — see chart below).  Resource investment, which accounted for 30% of total business capital spending before the downturn, is still shrinking — and possibly even faster than in the first half, in response to the dismal trends in commodity prices.

3Q Table

As I argued when the second quarter GDP numbers confirmed the recession, the big issue is not whether GDP growth is slightly positive or slightly negative.  The big issue is why it has been so close to zero in the first place.  The July GDP numbers do not change that analysis.  And they do not change the empirical fact that the Harper government’s overall economic record — even before this year’s downturn — is uniquely weak, on both historical and international criteria.

Third quarter GDP data will not be released until December 1.  That’s when the recession (yes, shallow and possibly short-lived, but a recession all the same) may or may not be relegated to the history books.  And by then, the election will also be in the history books.

Enjoy and share:

Comments

Comment from Stephen Thompson
Time: September 30, 2015, 11:29 am

Completely agree. CPC’s approach to touting economic sustainability is just another bank shot off two rails and then pocketing the cue ball. It’s all about the spin and the “terminological inexactitudes”. I sincerely wish there was a politician active today in whom I could believe. But, sadly, “that dog won’t hunt”. Bob Rae’s “What’s Happened to Politics” is a good reveal on the true nature of the second oldest profession.

SRT

Comment from Paul Tulloch
Time: September 30, 2015, 6:05 pm

ome more info will be out just next week on the health of the manufacturing sector- RBC’s PMI report shows that instead of getting a bounce from the low dollar- other forces at play have been lowering the PMI which is a proven leading indicator of the manufacturing sector.

Here is a link to the PMI and notice for JUNE- Aug it has dropped substantially!
http://www.tradingeconomics.com/canada/manufacturing-pmi

Comment from Larry Kazdan
Time: October 1, 2015, 5:58 am

Canada – by hook or by crook there will fiscal deficits
http://bilbo.economicoutlook.net/blog/?p=31985

“The Government and the main opposition party are heading into the national election boasting that each will achieve a fiscal surplus in the coming year. That is now unlikely because the downturn in the economic cycle (Canada is now in recession) will work against the aspirations of the politicians. They will end up with a fiscal deficit whether they like it or not. If they take the (stupid) neo-liberal path and fight against the private spending cycle, Canada will end up with what I call a ‘bad’ deficit driven by the automatic stabilisers – a rising deficit with rising unemployment and declining growth. Alternatively, it can take the sensible path and introduce new discretionary spending programs to allow a ‘good’ deficit to emerge where the public spending supports the moderation in private spending and unemployment does not rise. That is the preferred path but I doubt that either major party in Canada is mature enough and educated enough to take that action.

***

Canadian business is also worried about the deficit fetishism among the political class. In an article (June 23, 2015) – Why the federal government shouldn’t balance the budget – published by Canadian Business, the author says that “the obsession with balanced budgets is a … dangerous delusion”.

The article said:

Nothing can shake Canada’s political class from its obsession with balanced budgets—not even the prospect of a recession …

The article falters in logic but the conclusion is correct. The last thing the Canadian government should be doing right now is targetting fiscal surpluses.”

Comment from Larry Kazdan
Time: October 1, 2015, 5:59 am

Canada – by hook or by crook there will fiscal deficits
http://bilbo.economicoutlook.net/blog/?p=31985

“The Government and the main opposition party are heading into the national election boasting that each will achieve a fiscal surplus in the coming year. That is now unlikely because the downturn in the economic cycle (Canada is now in recession) will work against the aspirations of the politicians. They will end up with a fiscal deficit whether they like it or not. If they take the (stupid) neo-liberal path and fight against the private spending cycle, Canada will end up with what I call a ‘bad’ deficit driven by the automatic stabilisers – a rising deficit with rising unemployment and declining growth. Alternatively, it can take the sensible path and introduce new discretionary spending programs to allow a ‘good’ deficit to emerge where the public spending supports the moderation in private spending and unemployment does not rise. That is the preferred path but I doubt that either major party in Canada is mature enough and educated enough to take that action.

***

Canadian business is also worried about the deficit fetishism among the political class. In an article (June 23, 2015) – Why the federal government shouldn’t balance the budget – published by Canadian Business, the author says that “the obsession with balanced budgets is a … dangerous delusion”.

The article said:

Nothing can shake Canada’s political class from its obsession with balanced budgets—not even the prospect of a recession …

The article falters in logic but the conclusion is correct. The last thing the Canadian government should be doing right now is targeting fiscal surpluses.”

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