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  • Kate McInturff Fellowship in Gender Justice September 19, 2018
    The CCPA is pleased to announce the creation of the Kate McInturff Fellowship in Gender Justice.This Fellowship is created to honour the legacy of senior researcher Kate McInturff who passed away in July 2018. Kate was a feminist trailblazer in public policy and gender-based research and achieved national acclaim for researching, writing, and producing CCPA’s […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • The buck-a-beer challenge Ontario deserves September 6, 2018
    Ricardo Tranjan proposes an alternate plan to Doug Ford's buck-a-beer challenge in the Toronto Star.
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • Growing number of professionals face job insecurity, study finds September 6, 2018
    The Toronto Star's Sara Mojtehedzadeh discusses the findings of the CCPA Ontario's report, No Safe Harbour and gathers firsthand accounts from precariously employed professionals who live and work in Ontario.
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • Our Schools/Our Selves: The view from West Virginia September 4, 2018
    Our latests publication, Lesson Here, digs in to the West Viriginia teachers' strike.  Read the firsthand accounts of the work stoppage here.
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • What do the two largest mining disasters in Canada's and Brazil's history have in common? August 20, 2018
    Tailings dam spills at Mount Polley and Mariana: Chronicles of disasters foretold  explores the many parallels between the tailings dam spills at the Mount Polley mine in British Columbia, Canada, and the Samarco mine in Mariana, Minas Gerais, Brazil. The Mount Polley disaster took place in August 2014, when the dam holding toxic waste from […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
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The Progressive Economics Forum

Rising Homelessness

In 2010, I wrote a blog post in which I suggested that: a) the recession of 2008-2009 would bring on increased homelessness; and b) there would be a lag effect of roughly three to five years.  Indeed, I suggested that it would not be until 2014 until the full effect of the recession is seen in terms of homeless numbers.

Recent data from the City of Toronto appear to lend support to my prediction.

 

Enjoy and share:

Comments

Comment from Paul Tulloch
Time: April 2, 2014, 11:37 pm

even the graphs they use try and hide the poor- gees when will the city figure out hiding the poor or ignoring them only makes it feel better for a while- eventually even the stacked bar graphs cannot hide the trend! Wow that is indeed some massive growth in dire need. So much we have, and so much we need to share more.

Comment from fjf
Time: April 9, 2014, 1:59 am

A question on the methodology.

The title indicates that this is a census of users of the city of Toronto shelter system.

We know that the past winter has been one of significant severity.

My reading of the graph is that there was a significant population of Toronto homeless who were able to survive past winters without having need of recourse to city shelters. Since they were not in city shelters they were not counted in any prior homeless census.

But the severity of the current winter has driven these persons into the shelter system where they are made subject to the census and are now being counted.

If correct, this interpretation suggests that most prior estimates of the homeless population result in a significant under counting of the actual numbers of homeless. If you can minimize a problem through the use of bad data then you can avoid the need to actually do something about the problem.

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