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  • CCPA's National Office has moved! May 11, 2018
      The week of May 1st, the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives' National Office moved to 141 Laurier Ave W, Suite 1000, Ottawa ON, K1P 5J2. Please note that our phone, fax and general e-mail will remain the same: Telephone: 613-563-1341 | Fax: 613-233-1458 | Email: ccpa@policyalternatives.ca  
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • What are Canada’s energy options in a carbon-constrained world? May 1, 2018
    Canada faces some very difficult choices in maintaining energy security while meeting emissions reduction targets.  A new study by veteran earth scientist David Hughes—published through the Corporate Mapping Project, the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives and the Parkland Institute—is a comprehensive assessment of Canada’s energy systems in light of the need to maintain energy security and […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • The 2018 Living Wage for Metro Vancouver April 25, 2018
    The cost of raising a family in British Columbia increased slightly from 2017 to 2018. A $20.91 hourly wage is needed to cover the costs of raising a family in Metro Vancouver, up from $20.61 per hour in 2017 due to soaring housing costs. This is the hourly wage that two working parents with two young children […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • Mobility pricing must be fair and equitable for all April 12, 2018
    As Metro Vancouver’s population has grown, so have its traffic congestion problems. Whether it’s a long wait to cross a bridge or get on a bus, everyone can relate to the additional time and stress caused by a transportation system under strain. Mobility pricing is seen as a solution to Metro Vancouver’s transportation challenges with […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • Budget 2018: The Most Disappointing Budget Ever March 14, 2018
    Premier Pallister’s Trump-esque statement that budget 2018 was going to be the “best budget ever” has fallen a bit flat. Instead of a bold plan to deal with climate change, poverty and our crumbling infrastructure, we are presented with two alarmist scenarios to justify further tax cuts and a lack of decisive action: the recent […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
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The Progressive Economics Forum

StatCan Reports Fewest Vacant Jobs on Record

Statistics Canada reported today that there were only 199,700 vacant jobs in December 2013, the fewest recorded since it first reported these figures for March 2011.

Statistics Canada began tracking job vacancies in response to claims of a labour shortage by governments and corporate Canada. But the number of vacancies falling below 200,000 casts further doubt on the notion that Canada is suffering from a shortage of workers.

The real problem is a shortage of jobs. Statistics Canada calculates that there are 6.3 unemployed workers per available job.

Policymakers should focus on creating jobs and providing adequate benefits to the unemployed, rather than on alleviating phantom labour shortages.

UPDATE (March 19): Interviewed on last night’s The National (CBC video) and quoted in today’s Globe & Mail (page A10), Regina Leader-Post (page D1) and Saskatoon StarPhoenix (page D4).

Enjoy and share:

Comments

Comment from Todd
Time: March 18, 2014, 4:21 pm

Although I’d agree that the numbers presented in the 2014 federal budget are misleading in the sense that a national labour shortage is a myth. But is it still not possible that certain regions of the country are showing signs of difficulty with respect to acquiring skilled workers.

Certainly there are available workers in Atlantic Canada that could staff available positions in Alberta or Saskatchewan…but what if people are tired of having to move away from their home?

Comment from Larry Kazdan
Time: March 20, 2014, 2:02 am

The Job Guarantee: A Government Plan for Full Employment

The benefits of full employment include production of goods, services and income; on-the-job training and skill development; poverty alleviation; community building and social networking; social, political and economic stability; and social multipliers (positive feedbacks and reinforcing dynamics that create a virtuous cycle of socioeconomic benefits). An “employer of last resort” program would restore the government’s lost commitment to full employment in recognition of the fact that the total impact would exceed the sum of the benefits.

more at http://www.thenation.com/article/161249/job-guarantee-government-plan-full-employment#

Comment from Jack Saturday
Time: April 3, 2014, 6:08 pm

The real problem is a shortage of vision a few decades into an abundance economy. “Creating jobs” is like trying to improve the horse-and-buggy not only after the Model T, but after the Lamborghini. The work-like-a-horse ethic is obsolete. The livable Basic Income Guarantee starts our engines, gentlemen (and ladies), and ends centuries of exploitation.

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