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  • Boom, Bust and Consolidation November 9, 2018
    The five largest bitumen-extractive corporations in Canada control 79.3 per cent of Canada’s productive capacity of bitumen. The Big Five—Suncor Energy, Canadian Natural Resources Limited (CNRL), Cenovus Energy, Imperial Oil and Husky Energy—collectively control 90 per cent of existing bitumen upgrading capacity and are positioned to dominate Canada’s future oil sands development. In a sense they […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • A new Director for CCPA's BC Office: Message from Mary Childs, Board Chair October 24, 2018
    The CCPA-BC Board of Directors is delighted to share the news that Shannon Daub will be the next BC Director of the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives. Last spring, Seth Klein announced that, after 22 years, he would be stepping down as founding Director of the CCPA-BC at the end of 2018. The CCPA-BC’s board […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • Who Owns Canada’s Fossil-Fuel Sector? October 15, 2018
    The major investors in Canada’s fossil-fuel sector have high stakes in maintaining business as usual rather than addressing the industry’s serious climate issues, says a new Corporate Mapping Project study.  And as alarms ring over our continued dependence on natural gas, coal and oil, these investors have both an interest in the continued growth of […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • Pharmacare consensus principles released today September 24, 2018
    A diverse coalition representing health care providers, non-profit organizations, workers, seniors, patients and academics has come together to issue a statement of consensus principles for the establishment of National Pharmacare in Canada. Our coalition believes that National Pharmacare should be a seamless extension of the existing universal health care system in Canada, which covers medically […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • Kate McInturff Fellowship in Gender Justice September 19, 2018
    The CCPA is pleased to announce the creation of the Kate McInturff Fellowship in Gender Justice.This Fellowship is created to honour the legacy of senior researcher Kate McInturff who passed away in July 2018. Kate was a feminist trailblazer in public policy and gender-based research and achieved national acclaim for researching, writing, and producing CCPA’s […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
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The Progressive Economics Forum

StatCan Reports Fewest Vacant Jobs on Record

Statistics Canada reported today that there were only 199,700 vacant jobs in December 2013, the fewest recorded since it first reported these figures for March 2011.

Statistics Canada began tracking job vacancies in response to claims of a labour shortage by governments and corporate Canada. But the number of vacancies falling below 200,000 casts further doubt on the notion that Canada is suffering from a shortage of workers.

The real problem is a shortage of jobs. Statistics Canada calculates that there are 6.3 unemployed workers per available job.

Policymakers should focus on creating jobs and providing adequate benefits to the unemployed, rather than on alleviating phantom labour shortages.

UPDATE (March 19): Interviewed on last night’s The National (CBC video) and quoted in today’s Globe & Mail (page A10), Regina Leader-Post (page D1) and Saskatoon StarPhoenix (page D4).

Enjoy and share:

Comments

Comment from Todd
Time: March 18, 2014, 4:21 pm

Although I’d agree that the numbers presented in the 2014 federal budget are misleading in the sense that a national labour shortage is a myth. But is it still not possible that certain regions of the country are showing signs of difficulty with respect to acquiring skilled workers.

Certainly there are available workers in Atlantic Canada that could staff available positions in Alberta or Saskatchewan…but what if people are tired of having to move away from their home?

Comment from Larry Kazdan
Time: March 20, 2014, 2:02 am

The Job Guarantee: A Government Plan for Full Employment

The benefits of full employment include production of goods, services and income; on-the-job training and skill development; poverty alleviation; community building and social networking; social, political and economic stability; and social multipliers (positive feedbacks and reinforcing dynamics that create a virtuous cycle of socioeconomic benefits). An “employer of last resort” program would restore the government’s lost commitment to full employment in recognition of the fact that the total impact would exceed the sum of the benefits.

more at http://www.thenation.com/article/161249/job-guarantee-government-plan-full-employment#

Comment from Jack Saturday
Time: April 3, 2014, 6:08 pm

The real problem is a shortage of vision a few decades into an abundance economy. “Creating jobs” is like trying to improve the horse-and-buggy not only after the Model T, but after the Lamborghini. The work-like-a-horse ethic is obsolete. The livable Basic Income Guarantee starts our engines, gentlemen (and ladies), and ends centuries of exploitation.

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