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  • Help us build a better Ontario September 14, 2017
    If you live in Ontario, you may have recently been selected to receive our 2017 grassroots poll on vital issues affecting the province. Your answers to these and other essential questions will help us decide what issues to focus on as we head towards the June 2018 election in Ontario. For decades, the CCPA has […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • Does the Site C dam make economic sense for BC? August 31, 2017
    Today CCPC-BC senior economist Marc Lee submitted an analysis to the BC Utilities Commission in response to their consultation on the economics of the Site C dam. You can read it here. In short, the submission discussses how the economic case for Site C assumes that industrial demand for electricity—in particular for natural gas extraction […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • Ontario's middle and working class families are losing ground August 15, 2017
    Ontario is becoming more polarized as middle and working class families see their share of the income pie shrinking while upper middle and rich families take home even more. New research from CCPA-Ontario Senior Economist Sheila Block reveals a staggering divide between two labour markets in the province: the top half of families continue to pile […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • Join us in October for the CCPA-BC fundraising gala, featuring Senator Murray Sinclair August 14, 2017
    We are incredibly honoured to announce that Senator Murray Sinclair will address our 2017 Annual Gala as keynote speaker, on Thursday, October 19 in Vancouver. Tickets are now on sale. Will you join us? Senator Sinclair has served as chair of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC), was the first Indigenous judge appointed in Manitoba, […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • How to make NAFTA sustainable, equitable July 19, 2017
    Global Affairs Canada is consulting Canadians on their priorities for, and concerns about, the planned renegotiation of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). In CCPA’s submission to this process, Scott Sinclair, Stuart Trew and Hadrian Mertins-Kirkwood point out how NAFTA has failed to live up to its promise with respect to job and productivity […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
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The Progressive Economics Forum

No News is Bad News for Canada’s Job Market

Today’s job numbers are remarkably similar to last month’s figures. Total employment as well as employment in most sectors and industries was virtually unchanged. Stagnation is bad news given our growing population and that 1.4 million Canadians remain unemployed.

There were also some notable shifts beneath the headline numbers. Total employment stayed the same because 32,200 additional part-time positions masked the loss of 32,400 full-time jobs. There was also a regional shift, with job gains in the western provinces offsetting employment declines in Ontario and Quebec.

A flat jobs report for June is perhaps not surprising on the heels of the incredible numbers reported for May. Putting aside fluctuations in the monthly data, the underlying story seems to be that Canada’s job market has been crawling along at a snail’s pace in 2013.

As Statistics Canada notes, employment growth has averaged 14,000 per month in the first half of this year. That is not enough to keep pace with population growth, let alone put a dent in unemployment.

UPDATE (July 7): This commentary was quoted on the front page of yesterday’s Toronto Star business section. My commentary on Thursday’s Statistics Canada article on youth employment was picked up by The National Post, Yahoo Finance and Canadian Press (using my pseudonym).

Enjoy and share:

Comments

Comment from R
Time: February 19, 2014, 3:45 am

The entire immigration, educational, medical system is a ponzie scheme scam cooked up by industry, government, and some agencies to enrich themselves. The mass migration of all sorts into Canada is only going to worsen the social, employment, unemployment, underemployment problems. It is a lie that declining births require the import of uncontrolled immigration and constant wasteful retraining at high expense to keep the economy going. The immigration, education, medical money milking machine is just siphoning wealth out of Canadian citizens, residents, immigrants alike. The schools, corporations, governments, and their supplies are benefiting by keep the scam going. Over supply of workers local and foreign will keep wages slavishly low, supply consumers, and supply tax revenue to governments. The ordinary people are all just treated like cattle. Some Canadian city regions are worse than others for jobs. Victoria BC is a good example. The metro region is very restricted, uptight, cliquey in all cultural things (economic, social, political). Education credentials, and experience doesn’t matter as everything is done by nepotism, corruption, connections. They will make up whatever excuses to say no, and never yes. Victoria BC good is bad and bad is even more bad. Other cities have their own version of corruption. Read the comments of those who came before you on http://www.ratemyemployer.ca, http://www.topix.com (Victoria BC section), http://www.yelp.com, http://www.thedirty.com, Yahoo Answers, Better Business Bureaus, etc. Insider information is a source of power. Naive ignorance is not bliss.

Comment from L
Time: May 5, 2014, 2:43 am

Victoria BC Canada is also where the 2014 McDonald’s Restaurants, Temporary Foreign Labour program corruption scandal started and then exploded across Canada to other cities and provinces. The hunt for other employers lying about having no citizen staff and needing to import cheap slave labour, is now going across Canada to other employers of all types and sizes. This is unsurprising as British Columbia (BC=Bring Cash) and Greater Victoria are famous for its culture of cheap and restricted. They are lacking in prospects and opportunities. It is not only about money, the social life is equally cliquey and restricted. You should also read web sites like Better Business Bureaus, Yahoo Answers, “Why Some Immigrants Leave Canada”, and others to get the big full picture of what life is like before you blindly and ignorantly move there.

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