Main menu:

History of RPE Thought

Posts by Tag

RSS New from the CCPA

  • Budget 2018: The Most Disappointing Budget Ever March 14, 2018
    Premier Pallister’s Trump-esque statement that budget 2018 was going to be the “best budget ever” has fallen a bit flat. Instead of a bold plan to deal with climate change, poverty and our crumbling infrastructure, we are presented with two alarmist scenarios to justify further tax cuts and a lack of decisive action: the recent […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • 2018 Federal Budget Analysis February 14, 2018
    Watch this space for response and analysis of the federal budget from CCPA staff and our Alternative Federal Budget partners. More information will be added as it is available. Commentary and Analysis Some baby steps for dad and big steps forward for women, by Kate McInturff (CCPA) An ambition constrained budget, by David Macdonald (CCPA) Five things […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • CED in Manitoba - The Video January 29, 2018
    Community Economic Development in Manitoba - nudging capitalism out of the way?
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • With regional management BC’s iconic forest industry can benefit British Columbians rather than multinational corporations January 17, 2018
    Forests are one of the iconic symbols of British Columbia, and successive governments and companies operating here have largely focussed on the cheap, commodity lumber business that benefits industry. Former provincial forestry minister Bob Williams, who has been involved with the industry for five decades, proposes regional management of this valuable natural resource to benefit […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • Community Economic Development in Manitoba - a new film January 16, 2018
    Cinameteque, Jan 23.  7:00 pm - Free event Film Trailer CCEDNET-MB, CCPA-MB, The Manitoba Research Alliance and Rebel Sky Media presents: The Inclusive Economy:  Stories of Community Economic Development in Manitoba
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
Progressive Bloggers


Recent Blog Posts

Posts by Author

Recent Blog Comments

The Progressive Economics Forum

Job Market Worsens in January

After five months of  job gains, the job market turned dismal in January. Officially, the unemployment rate fell from 7.1% to 7.0%, the lowest it’s been since December 2008. This is despite a loss of 45,800 jobs (not counting self-employment). The explanation is an out flux of discouraged workers from the labour market, which caused the ‘real’ unemployment rate (R8) to jump from 9.4% to 10.7%.

Gains in self-employment masked the job losses, as there was an increase of nearly 24,000 self-employed persons in January, for an official loss of 22,000, nearly all in full-time positions. Ontario suffered the worst losses in employment and labour market participation, losing 39,000 employees and gaining only 8,000 self-employed persons.  All of Ontario’s job losses were in full-time positions.

As we approach the 2013 Federal budget, we need to push for public investments in infrastructure and training that will lead to good jobs and increased productivity. This is the worst time to be blaming the unemployed for the lack of jobs.  This government talks a lot about jobs and growth, now it’s time to do something about it.

Enjoy and share:


Comment from Paul T. (I will not self identify)
Time: February 8, 2013, 11:40 am

three issues that trouble me with this report

1) Manufacturing Employment drops 21k- not good for growth and flies in the face of Phillip Cross’s assessment that things are just fine in manufacturing things are not.

2) self employment – masking more of a drop in employment- this question needs to be seriously redefined- self identifying self-employment is troubling for me- especially when you look at the long term trend of this variable it is a bit of a head scratcher in figuring this one out. Statcans need to re-evaluate how they define this- but it continues to contaminate.

3) Construction up increases 17K- and that is seasonally adjusted- are you kidding me- did anybody step outside this winter and notice how harsh this winter was??? Anybody that knows this survey knows that harshness of winter impacts the seasonal adjustment process. I wonder if we are not somehow free riding off the last few winters that have have been warm and worked their nasty little outlier asses off into reeking havoc on the adjustment process. (will have to check the raw data later) Also folding the housing drops since last fall, I fail to see such pressure for growth in this industry.

But then again, we do have wide wide Standard errors. Maybe we need to rethink monthly releases and start working toward quarterly. Especially given the fact that the census data for 2011 will be more erratic- I wonder what those National Housing response rates truly are?? I think it is time we put together an access to information request and found out.

Write a comment

Related articles