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  • Pharmacare consensus principles released today September 24, 2018
    A diverse coalition representing health care providers, non-profit organizations, workers, seniors, patients and academics has come together to issue a statement of consensus principles for the establishment of National Pharmacare in Canada. Our coalition believes that National Pharmacare should be a seamless extension of the existing universal health care system in Canada, which covers medically […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • Kate McInturff Fellowship in Gender Justice September 19, 2018
    The CCPA is pleased to announce the creation of the Kate McInturff Fellowship in Gender Justice.This Fellowship is created to honour the legacy of senior researcher Kate McInturff who passed away in July 2018. Kate was a feminist trailblazer in public policy and gender-based research and achieved national acclaim for researching, writing, and producing CCPA’s […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • The buck-a-beer challenge Ontario deserves September 6, 2018
    Ricardo Tranjan proposes an alternate plan to Doug Ford's buck-a-beer challenge in the Toronto Star.
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • Growing number of professionals face job insecurity, study finds September 6, 2018
    The Toronto Star's Sara Mojtehedzadeh discusses the findings of the CCPA Ontario's report, No Safe Harbour and gathers firsthand accounts from precariously employed professionals who live and work in Ontario.
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • Our Schools/Our Selves: The view from West Virginia September 4, 2018
    Our latests publication, Lesson Here, digs in to the West Viriginia teachers' strike.  Read the firsthand accounts of the work stoppage here.
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
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The Progressive Economics Forum

HRSDC Funded Research Contradicts Key Argument For New EI Policy

According to today’s Globe, the government says that the major target of pending changes to EI is frequent claimants, who are disproportionately to be found in  the high unemployment regions.

This focus seems to reflect the common belief that supposedly “overgenerous” EI benefits stop some people from moving from high to low unemployment regions.

Interesting to note, then, that research commissioned by HRSDC finds that the EI program has almost no impact on inter-regional labour mobility. Here is the summary and link to the full paper, taken from the latest  EI Monitoring and Assessment Report.

22. Policy-Induced Internal Migration: An Empirical Investigation of the Canadian Case

Author(s): Kathleen M. Day, University of Ottawa, and Stanley L. Winer, Carleton University

Objective(s): This study investigates the influence of public policy on interprovincial migration in Canada.

Key finding(s) referenced in the report:

  • The prime determinants of interprovincial migration were differences in earnings, employment prospects and moving costs.
  • EI is not a barrier to mobility, as eliminating regional EI extended benefits and regional EI differences in qualifying requirements would increase the volume of migration by less than 1%.

Availability: This paper can be found through CESifo at http://www.ifo.de/portal/pls/portal/docs/1/1188434.PDF

 

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Comments

Comment from Erin Weir
Time: May 18, 2012, 8:48 am

Just don’t send me to the turnip fields.

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