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  • Help us build a better Ontario September 14, 2017
    If you live in Ontario, you may have recently been selected to receive our 2017 grassroots poll on vital issues affecting the province. Your answers to these and other essential questions will help us decide what issues to focus on as we head towards the June 2018 election in Ontario. For decades, the CCPA has […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • Does the Site C dam make economic sense for BC? August 31, 2017
    Today CCPC-BC senior economist Marc Lee submitted an analysis to the BC Utilities Commission in response to their consultation on the economics of the Site C dam. You can read it here. In short, the submission discussses how the economic case for Site C assumes that industrial demand for electricity—in particular for natural gas extraction […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • Ontario's middle and working class families are losing ground August 15, 2017
    Ontario is becoming more polarized as middle and working class families see their share of the income pie shrinking while upper middle and rich families take home even more. New research from CCPA-Ontario Senior Economist Sheila Block reveals a staggering divide between two labour markets in the province: the top half of families continue to pile […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • Join us in October for the CCPA-BC fundraising gala, featuring Senator Murray Sinclair August 14, 2017
    We are incredibly honoured to announce that Senator Murray Sinclair will address our 2017 Annual Gala as keynote speaker, on Thursday, October 19 in Vancouver. Tickets are now on sale. Will you join us? Senator Sinclair has served as chair of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC), was the first Indigenous judge appointed in Manitoba, […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • How to make NAFTA sustainable, equitable July 19, 2017
    Global Affairs Canada is consulting Canadians on their priorities for, and concerns about, the planned renegotiation of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). In CCPA’s submission to this process, Scott Sinclair, Stuart Trew and Hadrian Mertins-Kirkwood point out how NAFTA has failed to live up to its promise with respect to job and productivity […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
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Poverty Reduction in Alberta

Over at the web site of the Calgary Homeless Foundation, I’m co-author of a blog post titled “Poverty Reduction in Alberta.”

Points raised in the blog post include the following:

-The NDP government of Premier Rachel Notley has undertaken important poverty-reduction initiatives since forming a government in 2015.

-Alberta (relative to other provinces) has a considerable amount  of income concentrated among a small group of households.  We use StatCan data to support this claim.

-Alberta continues to have the lowest level of taxation of any provincial government.

-Relative to other Canadian provinces, Alberta has very little public debt.

The link to the full blog post is here.

Enjoy and share:

Comments

Comment from Edgardo Sepulveda
Time: February 17, 2017, 9:46 pm

Hello Nick:

Thanks for link to the blog. I like the emphasis in paragraph 7 on social assistance. As I showed in my post last year http://www.progressive-economics.ca/2016/01/20/redistribution-inequality-and-federal-policy-guest-post-by-edgardo-sepulveda/, cash transfers are the most effective means to reduce after-tax income inequality.

Looking at the Caledon Institute report, I was surprised at the differential between Alberta Works (AW) and AISH benefit levels and how each of these compare to other provinces.

So what is the specific political “ask” in paragraph 7? Is it advocating an increase in AW benefit levels and/or AISH benefit levels? Or is it to make it easier to qualify to AISH? Or all of the above?

And more from an economics perspective, what are thoughts on the order of magnitude impacts on social welfare of each initiative? Given how absolutely/relatively low they are, an increase in AW benefit levels would be at the top of the list?

Comment from Nick Falvo
Time: February 18, 2017, 12:54 pm

Thanks for the comment, Edgardo.

We intentionally weren’t prescriptive in the post. Rather, we felt it was important to put some information in front of people and encourage discussion.

That said, you’ve just given us some ideas for one or more blog posts in the future. 🙂

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