Main menu:

History of RPE Thought

Posts by Tag

RSS New from the CCPA

  • 2019 Federal Budget Analysis February 27, 2019
    Watch this space for response and analysis of the federal budget from CCPA staff and our Alternative Federal Budget partners. More information will be added as it is available. Commentary and Analysis  Aim high, spend low: Federal budget 2019 by David MacDonald (CCPA) Budget 2019 fiddles while climate crisis looms by Hadrian Mertins-Kirkwood (CCPA) Budget hints at priorities for upcoming […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • Boots Riley in Winnipeg May 11 February 22, 2019
    Founder of the political Hip-Hop group The Coup, Boots Riley is a musician, rapper, writer and activist, whose feature film directorial and screenwriting debut — 2018’s celebrated Sorry to Bother You — received the award for Best First Feature at the 2019 Independent Spirit Awards (amongst several other accolades and recognitions). "[A] reflection of the […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • CCPA-BC welcomes Emira Mears as new Associate Director February 11, 2019
    This week the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives – BC Office is pleased to welcome Emira Mears to our staff team as our newly appointed Associate Director. Emira is an accomplished communications professional, digital strategist and entrepreneur. Through her former company Raised Eyebrow, she has had the opportunity to work with many organizations in the […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • Study explores media coverage of pipeline controversies December 14, 2018
    Supporters of fossil fuel infrastructure projects position themselves as friends of working people, framing climate action as antithetical to the more immediately pressing need to protect oil and gas workers’ livelihoods. And as the latest report from the CCPA-BC and Corporate Mapping Project confirms, this framing has become dominant across the media landscape. Focusing on pipeline […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • Study highlights ‘uncomfortable truth’ about racism in the job market December 12, 2018
    "Racialized workers in Ontario are significantly more likely to be concentrated in low-wage jobs and face persistent unemployment and earnings gaps compared to white employees — pointing to the “uncomfortable truth” about racism in the job market, according to a new study." Read the Toronto Star's coverage of our updated colour-coded labour market report, released […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
Progressive Bloggers

Meta

Recent Blog Posts

Posts by Author

Recent Blog Comments

The Progressive Economics Forum

Funding Cuts to Alberta’s PSE Sector: There Are Alternatives

It has recently been reported that the University of Alberta wants to “reopen two-year collective agreements” with faculty and staff “to help the university balance its budget…”

This appears to be in direct response to Alberta’s provincial government announcing in its March budget that there would be a “7% cut to operating grants to universities, colleges, and technical institutes.”

This strikes me as a curious turn of events, for several reasons.

-Alberta’s top income tax rate (i.e. the provincial share) is a mere 10%.  This is the lowest of any Canadian province or territory.  By contrast, Ontario’s is 13%, BC’s is 14.7% and Saskatchewan’s is 15%.

-Alberta’s corporate tax rate is also the lowest in Canada.  Indeed, along with Newfoundland and Labrador, New Brunswick, Ontario and BC, the provincial corporate tax rate in Alberta is just 10%.  By contrast, Saskatchewan’s is 12%.  Nova Scotia’s is 16%.

-There is no provincial sales tax in Alberta, making Alberta an anomaly among Canadian provinces.  By contrast, Saskatchewan has a 5% general sales tax rate (in addition to the federal sales tax rate of 5%), BC’s provincial rate is 7% and Ontario’s provincial rate is 8%.

-What’s more, as PEF blogger Jim Stanford makes clear in a recent talk, compared to workers in the rest of Canada, Alberta workers have not been earning their fare share of productivity increases.  Indeed, though wages are slightly higher in Alberta than in other provinces (in nominal dollars), productivity is vastly higher (and not fully reflected in worker wages).    In fact, Alberta’s real median wage growth between 2006 and 2011 has been the third-lowest among all Canadian provinces, despite the province experiencing rather robust economic growth.  And for the 10-year period ending in 2009, Alberta had the largest loss of “middle class income” (i.e. income share of the middle three quintiles of the population) of any Canadian province.

If Alberta’s provincial government is having trouble balancing its books, why doesn’t it increase taxes?

Note: Figures for provincial sales tax rates are from 2010.

 

 

Enjoy and share:

Comments

Comment from rcp
Time: August 8, 2013, 1:41 pm

The top marginal rate in Ontario is actually over 20%. I think you forgot the surtaxes.

Comment from Espoir Manirambona
Time: August 9, 2013, 3:21 pm

Isn’t Alberta suppose to be the wealthiest province now? Looks like the ruling class wants austerity even if there is more then enough money to pay for essential public services like education. The Tories are clearly not serving the interests of the working class.

Write a comment





Related articles