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  • Mobility pricing must be fair and equitable for all April 12, 2018
    As Metro Vancouver’s population has grown, so have its traffic congestion problems. Whether it’s a long wait to cross a bridge or get on a bus, everyone can relate to the additional time and stress caused by a transportation system under strain. Mobility pricing is seen as a solution to Metro Vancouver’s transportation challenges with […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • Budget 2018: The Most Disappointing Budget Ever March 14, 2018
    Premier Pallister’s Trump-esque statement that budget 2018 was going to be the “best budget ever” has fallen a bit flat. Instead of a bold plan to deal with climate change, poverty and our crumbling infrastructure, we are presented with two alarmist scenarios to justify further tax cuts and a lack of decisive action: the recent […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • 2018 Federal Budget Analysis February 14, 2018
    Watch this space for response and analysis of the federal budget from CCPA staff and our Alternative Federal Budget partners. More information will be added as it is available. Commentary and Analysis Some baby steps for dad and big steps forward for women, by Kate McInturff (CCPA) An ambition constrained budget, by David Macdonald (CCPA) Five things […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • CED in Manitoba - The Video January 29, 2018
    Community Economic Development in Manitoba - nudging capitalism out of the way?
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • With regional management BC’s iconic forest industry can benefit British Columbians rather than multinational corporations January 17, 2018
    Forests are one of the iconic symbols of British Columbia, and successive governments and companies operating here have largely focussed on the cheap, commodity lumber business that benefits industry. Former provincial forestry minister Bob Williams, who has been involved with the industry for five decades, proposes regional management of this valuable natural resource to benefit […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
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The Progressive Economics Forum

Another push for jobs by shifting the tax burden on workers…

… in Portugal.

Portugal’s Prime Minister announced on Friday that the government would raise workers’ social security contribution rates from 11% to 18% (about one month’s salary)… and decrease companies’ contribution rates from 23.5% to 18% in the same breath. The usual need for job creation is invoked as justificaion for the move… an interesting claim, especially in light of the current debates about “dead money” in Canada… It’ll be interesting to see if the Portugese government is more successful than the Canadian one in inducing investment from its corporations.

(To be fair, the government announced that it would also raise taxes on corporations and the rich (while taking away one month of public workers’ salaries). Rates are still to be announced, though, so the actual distribution of the burden remains to be seen.)

Enjoy and share:

Comments

Comment from Cuisine Minceur
Time: September 9, 2012, 6:20 am

This austerity obsession is hard to understand. It is like a kind of economic anorexia — the more decision-makers starve their economies, the more they believe they are rolling in fat. Except the decision-makers themselves are more like Stalin, blaming the “peasants” for their lack of productivity, because the alternative is to admit that their whole belief system is utterly flawed.

Comment from John Richmond
Time: September 12, 2012, 8:08 am

Is the austerity agenda hard to understand? It is about creating a leaner, meaner version of neo-liberalism, which if you believe in capitalism to begin makes a lot of sense (within its own self-referencial logic). I am reminded of what Brecht said about the government of the GDR, “If the government has lost faith in the people, maybe the government should elect a new people.”

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