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Tuition Has Increased 41% Since 1998

A recent cbc.ca article reports on plans by Quebec student groups to protest  planned tuition hikes by the Charest government. Over a five-year period, Quebec’s Liberal government plans to increase tuition by roughly 75 percent.

The article notes that tuition levels in Quebec are currently among the lowest in Canada. But as I’ve blogged about here, living conditions for many Quebec students are well below the poverty line. Indeed, 50 percent of full-time undergraduate students in Quebec report living on less $12,200 a year.

The article also offers a statistic I hadn’t seen before: across Canada, undergraduate tuition has increased by 41 percent since 1998 (after adjusting for inflation).

Enjoy and share:

Comments

Comment from Erin Weir
Time: August 24, 2011, 12:19 am

A fellow I know at the Canadian Federation of Students makes the case that we should refer to “tuition fees” rather than “tuition” (which can just mean teaching).

Comment from Nick Falvo
Time: August 24, 2011, 6:46 am

Good point. Thanks for the tip. 🙂

Comment from JR
Time: September 1, 2011, 8:25 am

I am in favour of an education system that is accessible to all – no one should be excluded if he or she has the talent to justify admission. A university education has to be ‘financially do-able’ for students and their families who support them. Price hikes have to reasonable. With that said, I read the cbc.ca article and thought back to what I paid for my tuition when I went to university in Ontario in the early 1990s. My tuition, if I recall correctly (and I believe that I do), was $1,100 per semester.

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