Main menu:

History of RPE Thought

Posts by Tag

RSS New from the CCPA

  • The 2018 Living Wage for Metro Vancouver April 25, 2018
    The cost of raising a family in British Columbia increased slightly from 2017 to 2018. A $20.91 hourly wage is needed to cover the costs of raising a family in Metro Vancouver, up from $20.61 per hour in 2017 due to soaring housing costs. This is the hourly wage that two working parents with two young children […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • Mobility pricing must be fair and equitable for all April 12, 2018
    As Metro Vancouver’s population has grown, so have its traffic congestion problems. Whether it’s a long wait to cross a bridge or get on a bus, everyone can relate to the additional time and stress caused by a transportation system under strain. Mobility pricing is seen as a solution to Metro Vancouver’s transportation challenges with […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • Budget 2018: The Most Disappointing Budget Ever March 14, 2018
    Premier Pallister’s Trump-esque statement that budget 2018 was going to be the “best budget ever” has fallen a bit flat. Instead of a bold plan to deal with climate change, poverty and our crumbling infrastructure, we are presented with two alarmist scenarios to justify further tax cuts and a lack of decisive action: the recent […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • 2018 Federal Budget Analysis February 14, 2018
    Watch this space for response and analysis of the federal budget from CCPA staff and our Alternative Federal Budget partners. More information will be added as it is available. Commentary and Analysis Some baby steps for dad and big steps forward for women, by Kate McInturff (CCPA) An ambition constrained budget, by David Macdonald (CCPA) Five things […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • CED in Manitoba - The Video January 29, 2018
    Community Economic Development in Manitoba - nudging capitalism out of the way?
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
Progressive Bloggers

Meta

Recent Blog Posts

Posts by Author

Recent Blog Comments

The Progressive Economics Forum

The Kids Are Not All Right

As is well-known, young people are still bearing the brunt of the recession. The employment rate for youth aged 15-24 last month was 55.6%, well down from 60.3% back before the recession in September, 2008 due to an increase in unemployment and an increase in those not looking for work.  And the proportion of youth in part-time jobs has risen.

The Table below – data calculated by my colleague Sylvain Schetagne from the Labour Force Survey micro data file – provides some interesting detail on those in this age group still living at home. (We are responsible for the computations and interpretation.)

The total number of youth at home rose by 55,400 or 1.8% between 2008 and 2010. This may partly reflect a move back home by those who have finished their studies or lost their jobs.

As shown, the number of youth at home in full-time jobs has fallen by 94,000, or by  12.8%, and the number who are not looking for jobs has risen by 106,700 or 9.6%.  This likely reflects trends primarily among the older part of the age group.

In short, if your kids are in the basement, you are far from alone.

  Youth (Age 15-24) Living at Home      
         
    2008 2010 Change
         
Population   3024.8 3080.2 55.4
Labour force   1912.9 1861.7 -51.2
Employment   1665.7 1554.7 -111
Full-time employment   737.2 642.9 -94.3
Part-time employment   928.4 911.7 -16.7
Unemployment   247.3 307.0 59.7
Not in labour force   1111.8 1218.5 106.7
Unemployment rate   12.9 16.5 3.6
Participation rate   63.2 60.4 -2.8
Employment rate   55.1 50.5 -4.6
Enjoy and share:

Comments

Comment from Michel
Time: June 22, 2011, 10:35 pm

I found that current youth unemployment is at 13.9%.

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/subjects-sujets/labour-travail/lfs-epa/t110610a1-eng.htm

I take it that the employment rate is taken to show that more youth are giving up on trying to find a job? But from a 20 year trend, the youth unemployment seems to be on or about average for the period.

http://www.tradingeconomics.com/canada/unemployment-youth-total-percent-of-total-labor-force-ages-15-24-wb-data.html

I’m not saying that this situation can’t or shouldn’t be improved, I’m just wondering why more young people moving back in with their parents after the financial crisis of 2008 is something to be deeply concerned about.

Comment from Gsalerts
Time: July 24, 2011, 8:42 am

One of my buddies is always talking about your blog at work – finally came and checked it out today, nice work! I’m subscribing to your rss feed – keep on posting!

Write a comment





Related articles