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  • Community Economic Development in Manitoba - a new film January 16, 2018
    Cinameteque, Jan 23.  7:00 pm - Free event Film Trailer CCEDNET-MB, CCPA-MB, The Manitoba Research Alliance and Rebel Sky Media presents: The Inclusive Economy:  Stories of Community Economic Development in Manitoba
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • Winnipeg's State of the Inner City 2018 January 3, 2018
    Winnipeg's community-based organizations are standing on shakey ground and confused about how to proceed with current provincial governement measurements.  Read the 2018 State of the Inner City Report.
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • Our Schools/Our Selves: Winter 2018 is online now! December 18, 2017
    For the first time, this winter we are making Our Schools/Our Selves available in its entirety online. This issue of Our Schools/Our Selves focuses on a number of key issues that education workers, parents, students, and public education advocates are confronting in schools and communities, and offers on-the-ground commentary and analysis of what needs to […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • Charting a path to $15/hour for all BC workers November 22, 2017
    In our submission to the BC Fair Wages Commission, the CCPA-BC highlighted the urgency for British Columbia to adopt a $15 minimum wage by March 2019. Read the submission. BC’s current minimum wage is a poverty-level wage. Low-wage workers need a significant boost to their income and they have been waiting a long time. Over 400,000 […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • CCPA-BC joins community, First Nation, environmental groups in call for public inquiry into fracking November 5, 2017
    Today the CCPA's BC Office joined with 16 other community, First Nation and environmental organizations to call for a full public inquiry into fracking in Britsh Columbia. The call on the new BC government is to broaden a promise first made by the NDP during the lead-up to the spring provincial election, and comes on […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
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The Progressive Economics Forum

Ontario Budget: Federal-Provincial Relations

My post on the night after Ontario’s budget hit the key features. However, the budget had a couple of other interesting aspects from a federal-provincial perspective.

Childcare Funding

Some progressive voices trumpeted the provincial budget’s allocation of $63.5 million annually to replace discontinued federal funding for childcare spaces. While the Ontario government finally made the right decision on this file, it got way too much credit.

First, $63.5 million is only 0.05% of annual provincial expenditures. This funding hardly represents a major commitment to public childcare.

Second, provincial income taxes apply to the tax base defined by the federal government. Because the last federal budget slightly broadened this base by closing some tax loopholes, Ontario’s government will automatically collect an additional $81 million annually. (See Table 3 on page 167 of the provincial budget.)

Taken together, these two federal policies reduced provincial transfer revenue by $63.5 million but increased provincial tax revenue by $81 million. Should we really applaud Queen’s Park for using three-quarters of its windfall tax revenue to replace the lost transfer revenue?

Equalization

Only a couple of years ago, Premier McGuinty was obnoxiously demanding that Equalization be abolished. But his government’s recent budget confirms that Ontario will actually receive a billion dollars of Equalization transfers this fiscal year. So, had the federal government followed McGuinty’s advice, Ontario’s deficit would now be a billion dollars larger.

McGuinty’s likely retort would be that Ontario stills pays more into Equalization than it gets out. The federal government spends $14 billion annually on Equalization and collects about 40% of its revenue in Ontario. In that sense, the province pays $5.6 billion into Equalization.

However, none of that money comes from the Government of Ontario. The province’s only “contribution” is that residents pay the same federal tax rates as all other Canadians.

In theory, if the federal government eliminated Equalization and cut federal taxes by a corresponding amount (e.g. another two points off the GST), the Ontario government could increase provincial revenues by occupying the tax room. But Ottawa has already slashed its taxes by more than that amount and Ontario has not occupied the tax room.

Since Queen’s Park is unwilling to raise provincial taxes, the only effect of scrapping Equalization would be to reduce Ontario’s provincial revenues by a billion dollars. Fortunately, the federal government ignored McGuinty’s recent demand to do that.

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