Main menu:

History of RPE Thought

Posts by Tag

RSS New from the CCPA

  • CED in Manitoba - The Video January 29, 2018
    Community Economic Development in Manitoba - nudging capitalism out of the way?
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • With regional management BC’s iconic forest industry can benefit British Columbians rather than multinational corporations January 17, 2018
    Forests are one of the iconic symbols of British Columbia, and successive governments and companies operating here have largely focussed on the cheap, commodity lumber business that benefits industry. Former provincial forestry minister Bob Williams, who has been involved with the industry for five decades, proposes regional management of this valuable natural resource to benefit […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • Community Economic Development in Manitoba - a new film January 16, 2018
    Cinameteque, Jan 23.  7:00 pm - Free event Film Trailer CCEDNET-MB, CCPA-MB, The Manitoba Research Alliance and Rebel Sky Media presents: The Inclusive Economy:  Stories of Community Economic Development in Manitoba
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • Winnipeg's State of the Inner City 2018 January 3, 2018
    Winnipeg's community-based organizations are standing on shakey ground and confused about how to proceed with current provincial governement measurements.  Read the 2018 State of the Inner City Report.
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • Our Schools/Our Selves: Winter 2018 is online now! December 18, 2017
    For the first time, this winter we are making Our Schools/Our Selves available in its entirety online. This issue of Our Schools/Our Selves focuses on a number of key issues that education workers, parents, students, and public education advocates are confronting in schools and communities, and offers on-the-ground commentary and analysis of what needs to […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
Progressive Bloggers

Meta

Recent Blog Posts

Posts by Author

Recent Blog Comments

The Progressive Economics Forum

Exhausting EI, Again

The content in the EI report by myself and Sylvain Schetagne which was released by the CCPA yesterday won’t be new to readers of this blog – an updating of trends in unemployment and EI use to show that tens of thousands of workers who lost their jobs early in the Great Recession are and will soon be exhausting benefits due to stubbornly high unemployment.

http://www.policyalternatives.ca/newsroom/updates/ei-isnt-working-canadas-unemployed

I can’t complain about lack of media coverage of this report, which got some welcome pick-up, though I do think there is usually massive media indifference to the plight of the unemployed victims of the Great Recession. Continuing unemployment of over 8% well into 2011 seems to have become the acceptable new normal, without thought being given to the human consequences.

There are a lot of personal stories posted among the many comments on our study on the CBC web site – and enough push back from those who think the unemployed are to be blamed for their own fate to tell us why EI usually falls well down the political agenda.

http://www.cbc.ca/money/story/2010/01/25/ei-benefits-running-out.html

Enjoy and share:

Comments

Comment from Paul Tulloch
Time: January 26, 2010, 7:54 am

Great report Andrew and Sylvain. Media were generous to you for sure.

There definitely is a malaise in the media developing that leaves the residual of nothing can be done, defeatist attitude in the minds of readers, which predictable feeds into the powers that be.

Comment from Dana rispolie
Time: January 27, 2010, 8:17 am

What gets under my skin is that the Canadian news media always say that the US unemployment is somewhere around 17% if all are added. My question as usual is why does are Canadian news media tell us Canadians what the real unemployment rate is. It is much higher than the 8.4% if you include people who do not collect EI but social assistance.

Comment from Purple Library Guy
Time: January 28, 2010, 12:37 am

What I always wonder is, if it’s all the fault of the unemployed if they don’t have jobs, how is it that unemployment rates can fluctuate much? Was there no crisis, just thousands of people suddenly becoming lazy and slothful who weren’t before? Or were people really thrown out of work, but it was a lurking moral malaise that stopped them from getting work again, and the difference between the current stubborn unemployment and short recessions is that this time the people who lost jobs all happened to also lack a work ethic? Should we reduce the unemployment rate by means of moral education? It’s nuts.

Comment from barbara broumas
Time: January 31, 2010, 12:33 pm

one thing that is never mentioned with unemployment,
that i was laid off feb 5th, 2008 with a one year severance pay. i was on long term insurance for a
work related injury and came back to work on jan 5, 2008 and two weeks later i was given a retirement package after working 15 1/2 years with the company.
i applied for unemployment, then was denied as i did
not have enough weeks to qualify. i appealed the decision and had them treat the disability as if i was
on workmen’s comp. the decision was made in december 2008 and my start date for payment was
feb 16, 2009. but when it came to the start date of
my unemployment, they said it is feb 16, 2008. why
is there such a big difference.

Comment from Anitha R
Time: February 2, 2010, 4:58 pm

EI in Canada has annoyed so many people that it raises concerns and questions for the future generation(s) to come. The eligibility in order to be consider an applicant of EI is to meet a minimum of 900 working hours. This in itself has acted as a tool to cut out individuals that preform precarious work, part-time work, self-employment, casual, summer, students, etc. The EI system is an intangible method to categorize individuals by outcasting them from basic and essential services they need. If EI were to improve and become more in frame with accomodation and eligibility, the rise of poverty wouldn’t be soo much atleast here in Toronto. I don’t see anything progressing in the long-run, but I know this has already caused detrimental effects on individuals givin the economic state we are in.

Write a comment





Related articles