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  • CED in Manitoba - The Video January 29, 2018
    Community Economic Development in Manitoba - nudging capitalism out of the way?
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • With regional management BC’s iconic forest industry can benefit British Columbians rather than multinational corporations January 17, 2018
    Forests are one of the iconic symbols of British Columbia, and successive governments and companies operating here have largely focussed on the cheap, commodity lumber business that benefits industry. Former provincial forestry minister Bob Williams, who has been involved with the industry for five decades, proposes regional management of this valuable natural resource to benefit […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • Community Economic Development in Manitoba - a new film January 16, 2018
    Cinameteque, Jan 23.  7:00 pm - Free event Film Trailer CCEDNET-MB, CCPA-MB, The Manitoba Research Alliance and Rebel Sky Media presents: The Inclusive Economy:  Stories of Community Economic Development in Manitoba
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • Winnipeg's State of the Inner City 2018 January 3, 2018
    Winnipeg's community-based organizations are standing on shakey ground and confused about how to proceed with current provincial governement measurements.  Read the 2018 State of the Inner City Report.
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • Our Schools/Our Selves: Winter 2018 is online now! December 18, 2017
    For the first time, this winter we are making Our Schools/Our Selves available in its entirety online. This issue of Our Schools/Our Selves focuses on a number of key issues that education workers, parents, students, and public education advocates are confronting in schools and communities, and offers on-the-ground commentary and analysis of what needs to […]
    Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
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Will privacy concerns kill Facebook?

As I mused yesterday about Facebook’s lack of respect for privacy in a bid to make billions, along comes a story putting Facebook’s valuation at $15 billion. But I’m not convinced Facebook is poised to take over the world just yet. Myspace once sat on top of the social networking world, and I’m wondering whether Facebook’s greedy compulsion to disregard users’ privacy will undermine its value in short order. In other words, is Facebook a bubble?

In the same Wired news feed as the $15 billion valuation comes a hint at an open source alternative for social networking. In the short term this could mean some plug-ins that could be integrated into WordPress, the fab and free open source software that powers this blog. Such a development might also deal with the platform compatibility issues that block users from different social networking sites from engaging with each other. Oh, Daddy likes …

Thanks to OpenID and OAuth, the Open Social Web is Beginning to Emerge

By Scott Gilbertson

Two fast growing standards in the world of identity management are paving the way for the open social web of the future. Earlier this week the final draft spec for OpenID 2.0 was released and, with the release of OAuth 1.0 last month, the open social web now has both a secure, centralized means of identifying yourself and a way to control who knows what about you.

Taken together, OpenID and OAuth establish an open, reusable means of turning the whole web into your own personal social network.

And this isn’t just some arbitrary standard that might be used in the future — OpenID is backed by big names like Microsoft and AOL and is already implemented on a wide variety of sites. OAuth is newer and less widespread, but it adds the key ingredient OpenID doesn’t handle — control.

Chris Messina, who has been working on OAuth and the open social web in general, has a post detailing what he’s doing with both specs and how these two might be used in the future.

It means that we now have protocols that can begin to put an end to the habit of treating user’s credentials like confetti and instead can offer people the ability to get very specific about they want to share with third parties. And what’s most significant here is that these protocols are open and available for anyone to implement. You don’t have to ask permission; if you want to get involved and do your customers a huge favor, all you have to do is support this work.

On the practical side, Messina is working on a series of WordPress plugins that use elements of OpenID, OAuth and XFN markup to make it simple for you to turn your blog or other WordPress site into a social network hub.

While these proposed implementations are specific to WordPress, the underlying ideas (and open code) could easily be ported to other platforms. For instance, Simon Willison has long supported OpenID on his blog.

To get a taste of what OpenID allows you to do head over to Willison’s blog and login using your OpenID url. Once you’ve identified yourself, Willison has some handy links to identify all the comments you’ve left on his posts and the posts themselves are included in your “watchlist” (essentially the things you find interesting on his site). Naturally all that data is available as an RSS feed for easy tracking.

At the moment Willison’s blog is an isolated, forward-thinking example, but when/if Messina releases his planned WordPress plugins, you can expect this sort of functionality (and more) to become far more widespread.

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