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The Progressive Economics Forum

Bubble bubble toil and trouble?

The bad news is starting to come in from south of the border. For those interested in following bubblemania, I recommend The Vancouver Housing Market Blog.

The LA Times reports:

The chief economist of the California Assn. of Realtors has stopped using the term “soft landing” to describe the state’s real estate market, saying she no longer feels comfortable with that mild label.

“Maybe we need something new. That’s all I’m prepared to say,” Appleton-Young said Thursday.

The shift in language comes as debate over the real estate market is intensifying. The long-awaited drop-off is happening, but there’s little agreement about how brutal the landing will be.

Federal Reserve Chairman Ben S. Bernanke said in congressional testimony Thursday that the national housing downturn so far appears orderly.

At about the same time, however, D.R. Horton Inc. Chief Executive Donald Tomnitz was telling analysts that the home builder’s sales in June “absolutely fell off the Richter scale.” Horton, the nation’s largest builder of residential housing, has numerous projects in California.

For real estate optimists, the phrase “soft landing” conveyed the soothing notion that the run-up in values over the last few years would be permanent. It wasn’t a bubble, it was a new plateau.

The Realtors association last month lowered its 2006 sales prediction from a 2% slip to a 16.8% drop. That was when Appleton-Young first told the San Diego Union-Tribune that she didn’t feel comfortable any longer using “soft landing.”

Hey, isn’t it always a “soft landing” that is expected, until it isn’t?

Enjoy and share:

Comments

Comment from jerry fahey
Time: July 26, 2006, 4:59 am

finally a straight foward comment from the board of realtors, not a bunch of statistics and macro economic mumbo jumbo.

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